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Archive for the ‘Bio’ Category

I’m still alive! It’s been two weeks since I last posted, and on the internet that’s an eternity, I know. But I’m still here. Lately I’ve been sinking a lot of energy into getting my design blog, Design Intervention, up to speed at Tumblr. Also, I’ve been trying to work out the particulars of printing and selling and giving away one of these 20K Leagues Under the Sea covers I designed (and you voted on). So don’t give up on Adventures of the Orange Monk just yet. I will announce a contest where you can win a 20KLUTS print absolutely free! The details will appear here first, so if you want the edge in the contest keep tuning in. After that, I’ll make a plug on Facebook, The Orange Monk’s Squire, and finally Design Intervention.

Until then — let’s get going on King Solomon’s Mines. Hoping to keep up the tradition of designing original art for the novels read and discussed on this site, I’ve decided to post a little bio on author H. Rider Haggard in a format which can easily slide into the “author flap” template in the future:

H. Rider Haggard

H. Rider Haggard

Henry Rider Haggard (b. 1856 – d. 1925) was an author of Victorian adventure novels. English born, Haggard lived and worked in South Africa for many years and his knowledge of the land and its cultures add depth to the exotic locales featured in his stories. One of the founders of the Lost World genre, his Allan Quatermain character (King Solomon’s MinesAllan Quatermain) served as the template for George Lucas’ and Steven Spielberg’s Indiana Jones character.
Another of his most famous works, She: A History of Adventure, is one of the best-selling novels of all time, and is generally regarded as a classic of imaginative fiction. Haggard has inspired generations of writers such as Robert E. Howard (Conan the Barbarian) and Edgar Rice Burroughs (Tarzan), and with his continued popularity (Allan Quatermain was featured heavily in both the graphic novels and the film of The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen) he will doubtlessly influence storytellers— and dazzle readers —for generations to come.”

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Tonight, I will be diving into 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, by Jules Gabriel Verne (February 8, 1828 — March 24, 1905), and I thought I would kick things off by listing a few interesting items about the author, such as:

  • Verne, along with H.G. Wells, is known as the “Father of Science Fiction.”
  • Ranks just behind Agatha Christie as the most translated author of all time (4,223 translations)
  • That being said, Verne has been mis-translated for a long time in English, resulting in a somewhat damaged reputation for using faulty scientific facts, when in fact the error was in the translation, and not in Verne’s works!
  • Verne is famous for anticipating many actual technological advances. In Paris in the 20th Century, he depicts air-conditioning, gas-powered automobiles, calculators, electricity, television, and the Internet, among other technologies, with uncanny precision. Other works have predicted space travel, helicopters, jukeboxes, and projectors. In 20,000 Leagues, of course, he writes about submarines and underwater hydrothermal vents, before either one had been discovered in reality.

Check back soon for updates from the novel itself. (As these will be more spread out than the Pirate Latitude discussions, you can expect them to be a good deal shorter!)

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